RAINFOREST
The World Heritage listed 'Wet Tropics' rainforest covers almost a million hectares of the north of Queensland. There are over 600 kilometres of road through the Wet Tropics, and this region is home to Queensland's highest peaks, Bartle Frere and Bellenden Ker, and Australia's longest single-drop waterfall, the 305 metre (1,000 foot) Wallaman Falls. This page is just a 'best of the best', all our favourite rainforest places and activities in Tropical North Queensland.
IN THE BOXES BELOW YOU WILL FIND ALL THOSE DESTINATIONS NESTLED IN THE WET TROPIC RAINFOREST OR VERY CLOSE TO IT. BROWSE THROUGH THEM AND DISCOVER ALL THE SECRETS STILL HIDDEN IN THE OLDEST RAINFOREST IN THE WORLD...
Although nowadays the Wet Tropics Rainforest only covers less than 1% of Australia, they are home to an incredible diversity of flora and fauna and present a living evidence of the ecological and evolutionary processes that have shaped Australia's ecological history for over 415 million years. About 3000 plant species from over 200 families are found here of which 50 of them are only found in the Wet Tropics, a third of Australia's 310 mammal species live here and 13 mammal species cannot be found anywhere else in the world. Some of the trees found here are more than 3000 years old and the tallest ones can reach up to 60 metres. Australia's most primitive kangaroo, the Lumholtz tree kangaroo, and the world's largest flightless bird, the Southern Cassowary, have made the Rainforest their home.

In order to protect this spectacular and valuable ecosystem, the Wet Tropics Rainforest was declared as a World Heritage site in 1988.

Rainforest Aboriginal people are the original owners of the Wet Tropics rainforests and have been since time immemorial. More than 20 Aboriginal tribal groups have ongoing traditional connections to land in and near the Wet Tropics World Heritage Area. The traditional estate boundaries are very different to the boundaries of the World Heritage Area. Each group has established obligations for management of their country under Aboriginal law.

To Rainforest Aboriginal people, the Wet Tropics Rainforest is a series of complex 'living' cultural landscapes. This means that natural features are linked to the Aboriginal people's religion, spirituality, social and moral organisation and even economic use (including food, medicines and tools). Story places such as mountains, rivers, gorges, trees, etc, are important to the Rainforest people because they symbolise features that were created during the ancestral creation perior, called the 'Dreaming' or the 'Dreamtime'.

In order to preserve the Wet Tropics Rainforest (again in Cairns Unlimited we love it) here are a few tips:

1. Don't leave the walking tracks, delicate ground cover plants are easily disturbed if we stamp on them.
2. Please if you need a fire, do not gather leaf litter and branches but use a fuel stove.
3. Take your rubbish with you when you leave. Do not bury it, feral pigs will smell it and dig it out.
4. Do not take your pets with you, they, as animals, will chase, scare or even kill the local wildlife.
5. Do not feed the wild life, human food can be harmful to the animals and feeding may lead to aggresive behaviour.
6. Do not pick, break or remove ferns, vines or any other plant, everything is protected.

CAIRNS UNLIMITED IS PROUD TO SUPPORT RAINFOREST RESCUE
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