CASSOWARY COAST- TULLY
Tully is an agricultural town, a small but busy rural centre surrounded by cane and banana plantations. However, there are numerous scenic areas to visit within a short distance. Tully has become a popular destination for backpackers in search of fruit picking work, but the town is probably most visited for the fine white water rafting to be had on the Tully River.
SCROLL DOWN OR USE THE LINKS ABOVE TO FIND MORE INFORMATION ABOUT TULLY. OR CLICK ON ANY OF THE HIGHLIGHTED TOWNS ON THE MAP TO VISIT SOME OF THE OTHER GREAT DESTINATIONS ON THE CASSOWARY COAST.
Tully's controversial Golden Gunboot. Click for larger photograph. Double-click to open our Tropical North Queensland 'BIG THINGS' page in a separate window. Tully was originally known as Banyan and it was first settled in the early 1870's when the nephews of famous pastoralist JAMES TYSON moved to the area to raise cattle and grow sugar. The Tully River was named after Surveyor-General William Alcock Tully in 1872 and the town was later named after the river. However, the town itself was not built until 1924, when the government began a sugar mill in the area, the largest sugar mill in Australia at the time. In 1925, the river was dammed for hydro-electricity and today it is a major supplier of electricity for the Cairns and Townsville region.

The town of Tully is famous for the amount of rainfall it receives, with an annual average of 4.27 metres!. Tully holds the record for the hightest annual rainfall in a populated area of Australia, with 7.9 metres in 1950. Considering these figures, no wonder Tully is known as the wettest town in Australia. Each year, together with the nearby city of Babinda, Tully competes for the 'Gumboot Award'.

The refreshingly authentic Tropical North Queensland town, nestled between Mount Mackay and Mount Tyson, still boasts a noticeably rural feeling about it, with plenty of shops selling local produce and fresh baked cakes and pies.

In March 2006, when category-five Tropical Cyclone Larry, which crossed the North Queensland coast, it was the region between Tully and Innisfail that was hardest hit. The local sugar cane industry suffered a severe blow, but the banana farmers were completely wiped out, their plantations decimated. Tully is the center of Australia's banana industry and press reports indicate that more than 200,000 tonnes of bananas, valued at $300 million, were destroyed. Such a blow to the country's banana production sent banana prices skyrocketing. Even six months after the cyclone, retail prices hovered around $10 to $12 a kilogram nationwide, compared to a previous average price of between $1 and $3 a kilogram.

ATTRACTIONS AND THINGS TO DO - TULLY

Visit the Jumbun Aboriginal Community and let thhe Girramay and Jirrbal Elders to show you their unique rainforest culture.Jumbun Aboriginal Tours, located close to Cardwell, will share with you a unique cultural experience that will stay with you well beyond your holiday. JUMBUN ABORIGINAL TOURS
Jumbun Aboriginal Community, Murray Upper
Phone (07) 4066 5654 / A/H 0405 315 090

www.jumbunaboriginaltourism.com.au

A unique cultural experience!

The Girramay and Jirrbal Elders of the Jumbun Aboriginal Community invite you to visit their small community and immerse yourself in their unique rainforest culture. The community is located at Murray Upper, between Cardwell and Tully/Mission Beach (Just follow the signs to the spectacular Murray Falls). The tour begins at the Community Store.

Your two and a half hour tour begins with an introduction to local Girramay and Jirrbal culture. You will be shown the precious artefacts kept in the community "Keeping Place" and enjoy refreshments. You will then meet your guides at Moombay, a beautiful site on the Murray River and a favourite camping spot of the Old people that is still being used today. During a guided rainforest walk you will be introduced to the rich cultural knowledge about the plants and animals around you. You will see mija (shelters) which rainforest Aboriginal people used to live in, and demonstrations of basket weaving and traditional jewellery-making. A unique cultural experience that will stay with you well beyond your holiday.

HISTORICAL SITES
GOLDEN GUMBOOT
We all know Aussies like big things, don't we? Well, keeping with tradition, the Tully Gumboot is 6.1 metres long and 7.9 metres high, as high as the highest annual rainfall in a populated area of Australia. This area was obviously Tully, and the year was 1950. The Golden Gumboot has a spiral staircase to the top of the boot that allows a view of the town from the viewing platform and is adorned with an oversize fiberglass green tree frog clinging to the lip of the boot. The gumboot features a museum that outlines the history of the town's floods and the current rainfall of the year. Don't leave Tully without a photo next to this true Queensland icon.

Erected in 2003, the Tully Golden Gumboot has attracted many visitors to the town. It was based on the gumboot trophy traditionally awarded every year to the wettest town in Australia. As a response to the Gumboot, Babinda, which has had more rain than Tully in recent years, has plans of building a giant umbrella, although it has not happened yet. CLICK HERE to visit some of Tropical North Queensland's many other 'Big Things'.

TULLY SUGAR MILL
The Tully Sugar Mill, built in 1925 by the Queensland government, was sold to cane growers in 1931 to become Tully Co-operative Sugar Milling Association Limited. In 1990, the Association became a public company. The Mill is one of Queensland's biggest mills, capable of crushing sugar cane at over 700 tonnes per hour. In 2002 the Tully Sugar Mill crushed more than 2.5 million tonnes of cane and produced over 300,000 tonnes of top quality raw sugar.

The Tully Sugar Mill runs daily tours during the harvesting season, which extends from mid June to mid November each year. These tours provide a great opportunity to learn about the growing, harvesting and processing of sugar cane into raw sugar, molasses and other by products. The tours take between one and a half hours to two hours and can be arranged at the Tully Information Centre. They run from Monday to Friday at 10:00am, 11:00am and 1:30pm and Saturday and Sunday at 11:00am and 1:30pm. Cost is $12 for adults, $8 for kids and there is a special family price: $30 for two adults and two children.

Please make sure to wear closed-in shoes and at least a short sleeve top. Children under 7 years of age are not allowed. Bookings are mandatory.


NATURAL SITES
TULLY GORGE FOREST PARK AND WHITE WATER RAFTING
With an area of over 80,000 hectares of rainforest and eucalypt forest, this state park is situated 40 kilometres north west of Tully. The park is ideal for bushwalking, swimming, camping and picnicking, and there are a number of creeks, scenic lookouts and a wide range of flora and fauna. This is the home of the Tully Gorge, widely known as the best spot for white water rafting, with grade three and four rapids. Some of the rapids are very dangerous and are not recommended for those without a high level of technical skill. Beginners must be under close supervision of highly experienced rafters at all times. Everyone white water rafting in these waters must be fully equipped with helmets, throw bags, lifejackets and first aid kits.

But if you'd rather watch others rafting, Cardstone Weir is the place. The best time is between 1:00pm and 1:30pm. We know it is very exciting, but please, don't forget to remain on the boardwalk, the rocks in the area are slippery and the currents are very dangerous.

Check our tours sections in this same page or go to our TOURS page for more information about these and other tours in the area.

MURRAY FALLS
30 minutes drive south west of Tully you can find Murray Falls, located in Murray Upper State Forrest. With their 30 metre drop, Murray Falls are one of north Queensland's most beautiful waterfalls. There is an easily accessible viewing platform, and a short boardwalk that takes you to the base of the falls. Also, a longer rainforest track leads you to the lookout above the falls. Remember to obey the signs and stay on the boardwalk, rocks in the area are slippery and can be dangerous.

Camping facilities, barbecues, showers, toilets, picnic tables and swimming are available.

For more information on Tully Gorge Forest Park and Murray Upper State Forest, please visit our NATIONAL PARKS page.

ALLIGATORS NEST
In contrast to the suggestion, there are no crocs (or alligators) in this delightful freshwater swimming hole. Situated only about 6.5 kilometres south east of Tully, Alligators Nest is equipped with barbecues and toilet facilities. It is ideal for a refreshing swim.

TOURS

RAGING THUNDER ADVENTURES
PO Box 1109, Cairns
Phone (07) 4030 7900 / Fax (07) 4030 7911
Raging Thunder Adventures specialise in white water rafting, and there is no other place like Tully River to have the best rafting of your life. Raging Thunder offer full day or half day tours, with rafting grade 3-4 rapids znd over 5 hours of rafting.

ECHO ADVENTURE & CULTURAL CENTRE
Mobile 0428 264 494 / Fax (07) 4068 8388
Echo Adventure, located west of Tully, offers a whole range of tours and activities. From traditional guided rainforest walks with the local Aboriginal people to birdwatching, rafting, river walks or canoeing trips among other activities.

R'N'R WHITE WATER RAFTING TOURS
278 Hartley Street, Cairns
Phone (07) 4041 9444 / Fax (07) 4041 9499
R'n'R operate white water rafting tours to the Tully River, Australia's best and most famous one-day white water rafting experience. It's the North's ultimate white water, white knuckle adventure, with up to 5 hours of rafting over more than 45 rapids through World Heritage Rainforest.

For a very comprehensive list of all the tours in Far North Queensland, please visit our TOURS page.

BUSHWALKING
MOUNT TYSON LOOKOUT
The lookout located at Mount Tyson offers fantastic panoramic views of Tully, the coast, Hinchinbrook Island and most of the surrounding shire. You can access the lookout via a walking trail (six kilometre return) that leads to the summit of the mountain. It's a steep and adventurous climb but the views from the summit are worth it. If you decide to make the climb, remember to wear sturdy shoes and take water with you.

To climb Mount Tyson you need to be experienced and fit, but there are over 150 kilometres of walking trails in the Tully Valley and you will certainly find one that suits you. All the tracks are interconnected and there are three long-distance options, with a wide array of shorter routes with different degrees of difficulty.


EVENTS
GOLDEN GUMBOOT FESTIVAL
Every year Tully celebrates the Golden Gumboot Festival to promote its reputation for being a 'Pretty Wet Place'. In the Golden Gumboot Festival, most of the entertainment is related to gumboots: decorated gumboots, gumboot throwing, banana packing in gumboots… So even if you are not very much into wet weather, get yourself here and don't worry about not having fun, it is guaranteed for the whole family.

For more festivals and special events around the region, please check out our complete and comprehensive TROPICAL NORTH QUEENSLAND EVENTS CALENDAR
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ACCOMMODATION - TULLY

Tully holiday accommodation is mostly budget accommodation. You will find traditional pub rooms, affordable motel accommodation, and a choice of campgrounds. Tully has two backpackers hostels as well, which are popular with working holiday makers employed in the local agricultural industry. Scroll down or use the buttons on the right to choose your style of Tully accommodation.


HOTELS

MOUNT TYSON HOTEL
23 Butler Street, Tully
Phone (07) 4068 1088

KINCORA HOTEL
25 Tully Heads Road, Tully
Phone (07) 4066 9350


MOTELS

TULLY MOTEL
Bruce Highway, Tully
Phone (07) 4068 2233


BED AND BREAKFAST

DJARAWONG LODGE BED AND BREAKFAST
717 Old Tully Road, Djarawong
Phone (07) 4068 6255 / Fax (07)4068 7533
Situated in the Mission Beach and Tully Hinterland and set amongst the green rolling hills of Djarawong with views to the east of Dunk and Hinchinbrook Islands, this purpose built B&B has only two rooms whose entry doors open onto wide all weather veranda.



BACKPACKERS HOSTELS

BANANA BARRACKS
50 Butler Street, Tully
Phone (07) 4068 0455
'Banana Barracks' is a purpose built working backpackers hostel, which means that you can get work picking fruit if you are ready to work hard. The hostel offers bungalows, equipped with a fridge, TV and sink, and 8-share budget dorms, with only beds in there.

HOTEL TULLY BACKPACKERS
5 Butler Street, Tully
Phone (07) 4068 1044

THE SAVOY BACKPACKERS
4 Plumb Street, Tully
Phone (07) 4068 2400 / Fax (07) 4068 2400
More information coming soon...


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CARAVAN PARKS AND CAMPGROUNDS

GOOGARRA BEACH CARAVAN PARK
7 Tully Heads Road, Tully
Phone (07) 4066 9325 / Fax (07) 4066 9966

ISLAND COAST CARAVAN PARK
Tully Heads, Tully
Phone (07) 4066 9260

LAKE HERON CARAVAN PARK
East Feluga Road, Tully
Phone (07) 4068 6285

TROPICAL ISLAND COAST CARAVAN PARK
Tully Heads, Tully
Phone (07) 4066 9260

TULLY CARAVAN PARK
Murray Street, Tully
Phone (07) 4068 2055



DINING - TULLY

TULLY COUNTRY CLUB
Pratt Street, Tully
Phone (07) 4068 2206

DI'S DINNER
51 Bryant Street, Tully
Phone (07) 4068 1650

FLAME TREE COFFEE LOUNGE
24 Butler Street, Tully
Phone (07) 4068 2207

SHERYL ANN'S COFFEE LOUNGE
20 Butler Street, Tully
Phone (07) 4068 2251

GETTING TO TULLY

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Find the best deal on a rental car or campervan in Tropical North Queensland with Cairns Unlimited.Of course if you've got a desire for the freedom and flexibility that can only be had at the wheels of your own vehicle, please visit our CAR HIRE page. We may be called Cairns Unlimited, but we can get you a great deal on a rental car or campervan anywhere! Simply fill out our obligation free enquiry form, and we will get back to you - usually the next working day - with the best deal on a vehicle to suit your needs.
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Greyhound Buses stop at Mission Beach on their route from Brisbane to Cairns, in Far North Queensland, and viceversa.Gordonvale, Babinda, Innisfail, Mission Beach, Tully and Cardwell are a scheduled stop on the regular Cairns to Brisbane Greyhound bus route, with up to five departures every day. A Greyhound 'bus pass' will give you the flexibilty to stop off at interesting destinations along the way.

Premier / Pioneer Motor Service run a bus service from Brisbane to Cairns and viceversa, stopping at Mission Beach on the way.Premier / Pioneer Motor Service also run a bus service from Brisbane to Cairns and viceversa. The buses stop at Proserpine, Airlie Beach, Bowen, Home Hill, Ayr, Townsville, Ingham, Cardwell, Tully, Mission Beach, Innisfail and Gordonvale.

Oz Experience offers transport along the East Coast of Australia, stopping at all the major spots from Brisbane to Cairns and viceversa, including Mission Beach and Tully.Mission Beach and Tully are two of the essential stops on all of the Oz Experience East Coast routes. Oz Experience has a range of passes and itineraries around the country.

The Tilt Train stops in Tully on its route from Brisbane to Cairns and viceversa.Tully is one of the stops of the Sunlander Train, in Tropical North Queensland.Tully is one of the stops of the Queenslander Train, in Tropical North Queensland.The two coastal railway routes, the Sunlander and the Tilt Train, stop at the Tully Railway Station, located on the Bruce Highway.
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One of most popular attractions in Cairns is the Great Barrier Reef.

Rafting on the Tully River. Click for larger photograph.
Fantastic view of Cardwell Beach. Click for larger photograph.
Dunk Island, Tropical North Queensland. Click for larger photograph.
Family Islands, Tropical North Queensland. Click for larger photograph.
Hinchinbrook channel, Tropical North Queensland. Click for larger photograph.


EMERGENCY SERVICES

In case of emergency only, dial 000. In all other cases, phone the local service for Tully:

Ambulance (07) 4068 1122 or 131233
Hospital (07) 4068 1144
Police (07) 4068 1200